Apples May Be Good for Bone Health

Apples May Be Good for Bone Health

Eating fruit is linked to higher bone density, which is a marker of bone health.

Researchers believe that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds in fruit may help promote bone density and strength.

Some studies show that apples, specifically, may positively affect bone health (15Trusted Source).

In one study, women ate a meal that either included fresh apples, peeled apples, applesauce, or no apple products. Those who ate apples lost less calcium from their bodies than the control group (11Trusted Source).

SUMMARY
The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds in apples may promote bone health. What’s more, eating fruit may help preserve bone mass as you age.
2. Apples May Protect Against Stomach Injury From NSAIDs
The class of painkillers known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can injure the lining of your stomach.

A study in test tubes and rats found that freeze-dried apple extract helped protect stomach cells from injury due to NSAIDs (11Trusted Source).

Two plant compounds in apples — chlorogenic acid and catechin — are thought to be particularly helpful (11Trusted Source).

However, research in humans is needed to confirm these results.

SUMMARY
Apples contain compounds that may help protect your stomach lining from injury due to NSAID painkillers.
3. Apples May Help Protect Your Brain
Most research focuses on apple peel and flesh.

However, apple juice may have benefits for age-related mental decline.

In animal studies, juice concentrate reduced harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) in brain tissue and minimized mental decline (16Trusted Source).

Apple juice may help preserve acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that can decline with age. Low levels of acetylcholine are linked to Alzheimer’s disease (11Trusted Source).

Similarly, researchers who fed elderly rats whole apples found that a marker of the rats’ memory was restored to the level of younger rats (11Trusted Source).

That said, whole apples contain the same compounds as apple juice — and it is always a healthier choice to eat your fruit whole.

 

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